DAILY DETOX

DailyDetox
DailyDetox

Overview

 

Daily detox is designed to reduce the muscle tension in the upper thoracic and lower neck extensor muscles that control the movements of head elevation and retraction of the shoulder blades.  This exercise also aims to mobilise the cervical spine joints to improve the movements in the neck region.

By reducing the tension in the upper thoracic and lower cervical muscle groups, you will be able to treat and improve the symptoms that are exhibited with a variety of upper back and lower neck pains.  These include stiff joints, cramping, strains, neck weakness and general pain & tightness.  

Set the Beartrap up with two cones at the uppermost part of the hoop.  

    1. Place the hoop of the Beartrap around the back of the head with the Beartrap logo facing upwards.
    2. Grab both handles with each hand and push away from the body whilst also add small circular movements.
    3. Change the width of the handles to adjust the position of cones on the spine.
    4. For a less intense treatment use the balls instead of the cones

Overview

 

Daily detox is designed to reduce the muscle tension in the upper thoracic and lower neck extensor muscles that control the movements of head elevation and retraction of the shoulder blades.  This exercise also aims to mobilise the cervical spine joints to improve the movements in the neck region.

By reducing the tension in the upper thoracic and lower cervical muscle groups, you will be able to treat and improve the symptoms that are exhibited with a variety of upper back and lower neck pains.  These include stiff joints, cramping, strains, neck weakness and general pain & tightness.  

Set the Beartrap up with two cones at the uppermost part of the hoop.  

    1. Place the hoop of the Beartrap around the back of the head with the Beartrap logo facing upwards.
    2. Grab both handles with each hand and push away from the body whilst also add small circular movements.
    3. Change the width of the handles to adjust the position of cones on the spine.
    4. For a less intense treatment use the balls instead of the cones

Treatment Techniques

 

Positions

– neck flexion: head looking down.

– neck extension: head looking down

Flexion

– Perform the movements with your neck flexed down so that chin is closer to the chest.  This will put the upper thoracic and lower cervical muscle on stretch and will create a more intense treatment through these areas. 

Extension

– Perform the movements with your neck extended so that you are looking upwards or in a more neutral position. This will take the muscles of stretch and allow easier treatment of the joints.

Extend and flex the neck

– Perform the movements while continuing to extend and flex the head.  This creates contraction and relaxation effects on the muscle during treatment.  This creates intermittent and varied treatment along the length of the muscles.  

Anatomy

 

Rhomboids

This muscle group is located at the back of the thorax underneath the trapezius muscle and acts to retract the shoulder blades so that the scapulae move closer to the midline and elevate the shoulders.  The Rhomboids (major and minor) attach to the spinous processes of the spine and attach to the medial border of the scapula.

Middle and upper trapezius

This muscle group is located at the back of the thorax over the top of the rhomboids and levator scapulae and also act to retract the shoulder blades so that the scapulae move closer to the midline and elevate the shoulders.  Additionally, the upper trapezius extends the neck by lifting the head upward. The upper trapezius originates from the base of the skull and inserts on the lateral ⅓ of the clavicle (collar bone). The middle trapezius originate from the spinous processes of the spine and attach to the spine of the scapula.

Levator scapulae

This muscle is located on the back of the neck lying underneath the trapezius and acts to elevate the scapula and shoulder region. This muscle originates from the outside of the upper cervical joints and inserts on the uppermost portion of the scapula (superior angle).

Cervical vertebrae

The small vertebrae of the neck that support the skull.  There are 7 cervical vertebrae interspaced with small fibrous discs.  They have facet joints which commonly get stiff and painful and are located toward the outside of these vertebrae.

Thoracic Vertebrae

The medium-sized vertebrae of the thorax that have ribs attached to them.  There are 12 thoracic vertebrae interspaced with medium-sized fibrous discs.  They have facet joints which commonly get stiff and painful and are located toward the outside of these vertebrae.

Recommended Exercise Program

 

Self-treatment of the muscular system creates micro-damage and micro-tears within the muscle.  This is completely normal and helps the muscle relax, improve blood flow and overall function. Working out in the gym or performing exercise also creates these micro tears and damage to the body in the hope that the body will respond positively by getting stronger, greater endurance, increase power (speed + strength) which are all dependent on what type of stimulus you provide. The side effect of creating micro-tearing and micro-damage is that it can create post-treatment soreness (pain the following or following days).

Start off with a modest amount of treatment and see how the body responds.  Build up as the body allows.

If the pain on the post-treatment soreness is significant, give the muscle another day or two to recover before continuing further treatment.  However, if the following day, the muscle feels much better and only mild amounts of post-treatment soreness exist, then increase the timeframe or pressure of treatment.

Biofeedback

Muscular biofeedback is the body’s amazing ability to provide instantaneous feedback to the brain about which muscles are tight and where the treatment needs to be focused.  As massage creates micro-tears and micro-damage, the sensation is experienced as pain. The tighter the muscle, the more tearing or damage occurs and the pain sensation feels greater in this area.  Conversely, if the muscle is not as tight, there is less pain experienced when treating the muscle. Biofeedback is a great way to determine which muscles are tight and what areas need more work.

Recommended Exercise Program

 

Self-treatment of the muscular system creates micro-damage and micro-tears within the muscle.  This is completely normal and helps the muscle relax, improve blood flow and overall function. Working out in the gym or performing exercise also creates these micro tears and damage to the body in the hope that the body will respond positively by getting stronger, greater endurance, increase power (speed + strength) which are all dependent on what type of stimulus you provide. The side effect of creating micro-tearing and micro-damage is that it can create post-treatment soreness (pain the following or following days).

Start off with a modest amount of treatment and see how the body responds.  Build up as the body allows.

If the pain on the post-treatment soreness is significant, give the muscle another day or two to recover before continuing further treatment.  However, if the following day, the muscle feels much better and only mild amounts of post-treatment soreness exist, then increase the timeframe or pressure of treatment.

Biofeedback

Muscular biofeedback is the body’s amazing ability to provide instantaneous feedback to the brain about which muscles are tight and where the treatment needs to be focused.  As massage creates micro-tears and micro-damage, the sensation is experienced as pain. The tighter the muscle, the more tearing or damage occurs and the pain sensation feels greater in this area.  Conversely, if the muscle is not as tight, there is less pain experienced when treating the muscle. Biofeedback is a great way to determine which muscles are tight and what areas need more work.

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