ARCHER

Archer

Overview

The Archer is designed to reduce the muscle tension in both the forearm flexors and extensors.  By reducing the tension in these large forearm muscle groups, you will be able to treat and improve the symptoms that are exhibited with Golfers elbow (Medial epicondylagia), Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylagia), Carpal tunnel syndrome, hand weakness and forearm pain & tightness.  

Set the Beartrap up with a roller on either side.  The Archer is performed in a seated position with the Beartrap handles placed under each thigh as close to the knees as possible.  Make sure the handles are compressed between the thigh and the seat so that the handles are stabilised. Grab the top of the Beartrap with one hand and pass the other hand through the rollers.

The Beartrap rollers are used to cover large areas of muscle, whereas the trigger balls and cones are used to target more specific areas of tightness.  

    • The wave roller is designed for a more intense or deeper treatment, whereas the flat roller is designed for a more moderate or superficial treatment. 
    • To change the pressure of the treatment, adjust the width of your thighs to allow more or less room between the handles of the Beartrap. The wider your legs are, the softer the treatment will be. If your legs are closer, the treatment will become deeper and more intense. 

Overview

The Archer is designed to reduce the muscle tension in both the forearm flexors and extensors.  By reducing the tension in these large forearm muscle groups, you will be able to treat and improve the symptoms that are exhibited with Golfers elbow (Medial epicondylagia), Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylagia), Carpal tunnel syndrome, hand weakness and forearm pain & tightness.  

Set the Beartrap up with a roller on either side.  The Archer is performed in a seated position with the Beartrap handles placed under each thigh as close to the knees as possible.  Make sure the handles are compressed between the thigh and the seat so that the handles are stabilised. Grab the top of the Beartrap with one hand and pass the other hand through the rollers.

The Beartrap rollers are used to cover large areas of muscle, whereas the trigger balls and cones are used to target more specific areas of tightness.  

    • The wave roller is designed for a more intense or deeper treatment, whereas the flat roller is designed for a more moderate or superficial treatment. 
    • To change the pressure of the treatment, adjust the width of your thighs to allow more or less room between the handles of the Beartrap. The wider your legs are, the softer the treatment will be. If your legs are closer, the treatment will become deeper and more intense. 

Treatment Techniques

 

Positions
– Supinated: palm facing upwards
– Neutral: Palm facing inward and thumb toward the ceiling
– Pronated: Palm facing downward
– Open and closed fist

Speed
– Fast: Typically performed when the pressure is light.
– Slow: typically performed when the pressure is deep.
– Pausing: Pause on areas of concentrated tightness.

Wrist extension
– Perform the movements with your wrist cocked back.  This will put the forearm flexor muscles on stretch and will create a more intense treatment on the flexor (palm) side.

Wrist flexion
– Perform the movements with your wrist flexed inward. This will put the forearm flexor muscles on stretch and will create a more intense treatment on the extensor side.

Open hand and close hand
– Perform the movements while continuing to open and close the fist.  This creates contraction and relaxation effects on the muscle during treatment.  This creates intermittent and varied treatment along the length of the muscle.

Anatomy

Forearm flexors
Muscles located on the palm side of the forearm that close the fingers & thumb.  They also flex the wrist joint. 

Medial epicondyle
The bony prominence on the inside of the elbow.  The forearm flexor muscles all originate and pull from this attachment site.  When this bone is tender and sore we term this medial epicondylagia or more commonly Golfers elbow.

Forearm extensors
The muscles located on the back of the forearm that act to open the hand or cock the wrist backward.

Lateral epicondyle
The bony point on the outside of the elbow.  The forearm extensors originate and pull from this attachment site. When this bone is tender and sore we term this lateral epicondylagia or more commonly Tennis elbow.

Carpal tunnel
The tunnel refers to the passage between the carpal bones (bones of the wrist joint) and the flexor retinaculum (the ligament that creates the arch of the tunnel) providing a channel for the forearm flexor muscles and nerves (palm side) to travel through.  When the space of this tunnel is reduced due to tight and swollen muscles an individual may experience Median nerve compression or otherwise known as Carpal tunnel syndrome. This results in pain in the hand and arm often accompanied with numbness and/or pins & needles.

Recommended Exercise Program

Self-treatment of the muscular system creates micro-damage and micro-tears within the muscle.  This is completely normal and helps the muscle relax, improve blood flow and overall function. Working out in the gym or performing exercise also creates these micro tears and damage to the body in the hope that the body will respond positively by getting stronger, greater endurance, increase power (speed + strength) which are all dependent on what type of stimulus you provide. The side effect of creating micro-tearing and micro-damage is that it can create post-treatment soreness (pain the following or following days).

Start off with a modest amount of treatment and see how the body responds.  Build up as the body allows.

If the pain on the post-treatment soreness is significant, give the muscle another day or two to recover before continuing further treatment.  However, if the following day, the muscle feels much better and only mild amounts of post-treatment soreness exist, then increase the timeframe or pressure of treatment.

Biofeedback

Muscular biofeedback is the body’s amazing ability to provide instantaneous feedback to the brain about which muscles are tight and where the treatment needs to be focused.  As massage creates micro-tears and micro-damage, the sensation is experienced as pain. The tighter the muscle, the more tearing or damage occurs and the pain sensation feels greater in this area.  Conversely, if the muscle is not as tight, there is less pain experienced when treating the muscle. Biofeedback is a great way to determine which muscles are tight and what areas need more work.

Recommended Exercise Program

Self-treatment of the muscular system creates micro-damage and micro-tears within the muscle.  This is completely normal and helps the muscle relax, improve blood flow and overall function. Working out in the gym or performing exercise also creates these micro tears and damage to the body in the hope that the body will respond positively by getting stronger, greater endurance, increase power (speed + strength) which are all dependent on what type of stimulus you provide. The side effect of creating micro-tearing and micro-damage is that it can create post-treatment soreness (pain the following or following days).

Start off with a modest amount of treatment and see how the body responds.  Build up as the body allows.

If the pain on the post-treatment soreness is significant, give the muscle another day or two to recover before continuing further treatment.  However, if the following day, the muscle feels much better and only mild amounts of post-treatment soreness exist, then increase the timeframe or pressure of treatment.

Biofeedback

Muscular biofeedback is the body’s amazing ability to provide instantaneous feedback to the brain about which muscles are tight and where the treatment needs to be focused.  As massage creates micro-tears and micro-damage, the sensation is experienced as pain. The tighter the muscle, the more tearing or damage occurs and the pain sensation feels greater in this area.  Conversely, if the muscle is not as tight, there is less pain experienced when treating the muscle. Biofeedback is a great way to determine which muscles are tight and what areas need more work.

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